August 7, 2019

Here at Palmetto Bluff, it all starts with the land. Surrounded by three historic rivers, and set amid 20,000 acres, Palmetto Bluff remains one of the wildest and most beautiful places in the Lowcountry. With a vast outdoor classroom at our fingertips, the Conservancy aims to be ambassadors to each of our owners, members, and guests, introducing them and teaching them about nature and conservation here at the Bluff.

And with over 300 educational events throughout the year, they’re doing just that. Most recently, the Conservancy invited younger visitors to learn about the wildlife here on the Bluff by hosting a Kids Camp. From birds to turtles to insects, campers learned just a little bit about what the Conservancy team does to help conserve the land and wildlife here at Palmetto Bluff.

We sat down with Anna Constantineau, one of our kid campers, to ask her some questions about her day at camp!

What is your name?

Anna Constantineau

How old are you?

8

Where are you from?

Bluffton, SC

What was the theme today?

Birds and Turtles

Tell us something you did today.

We played capture the flag, went on a nature walk, listened to a bunch of birds, and made turtle crafts.

Did you learn anything new today?

I learned that every bird has a different sound. I also learned that boy turtles have longer nails than girl turtles.

What was the coolest thing you saw today?

We saw a turtle that had a yellow belly with black spots!

What was your favorite part of the Kids Camp? Why?

My favorite part was going on the nature walk because it was fun to listen to the different birds. My other favorite part was that I got to meet some new friends!

Whether you’re interested in marking and recapturing turtles, learning about the fall migration of different bird species, or even the colorful history of the Octagon Plantation, the Palmetto Bluff Conservancy has an event for you.

Join us for these upcoming Conservancy events:

Marsh Ecology: August 16

Brown Bag Lunch Lecture: Walnut Grove Plantation: August 21


Conservation